5 Tips for Flu Season

5 Tips for Flu Season

 

Did you know that 80% of infectious illnesses are spread through hands and surfaces?

Reduce cross-contamination of germs by keeping a clean and hygienic environment.

 

Follow these 5 simple tips to stay healthy during this flu season!

 

Tip 1: Wash Hands Often

Wash hands, especially before eating, after using the restroom, and after being outside. Use soap and warm water for 20 seconds.

This is the minimum recommended time to get your hands clean. It is also important to dry your hands with a fresh, clean towel.

 

Tip 2: Get Immunized

The flu virus can spread fast, so get vaccinated.

You can get vaccinated for H1N1 and the seasonal flu at the same time, in the same shot.

 

Tip 3: Use Anti-Viral Facial Tissue

Some cold and flu viruses can live up to 24 hours on regular tissues, so use an Anti-Viral facial tissue that will kill 99.9% of common cold viruses.

 

Tip 4: Cough or Sneeze into your Elbow

One sneeze can spray up to 3,000 infection droplets into the air at more than 100 MPH. If you don’t have a tissue handy, use the inner part of your sleeve at the elbow. Do you part to help reduce the fast spread of germs.

 

Tip 5.: Stay Home if Sick

Don’t get your workspace sick by showing up sick. Stay home if your’re sick. The work will wait, and you won’t spread your illness to coworkers.

 

Reduce cross-contamination of germs by keeping a clean and hygienic environment.

 

You can also fight viruses and stay protected with Curad Anti-Viral Face Masks.

 

MSC351-2Be sure to check out our selection of Disinfectants to stay safe.384S-2

 

 

 

 

 

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Improving Academic Lab Safety

Improving Academic Lab Safety

The importance of safety education and incident reporting.

After recent incidents at UCLA and Texas Tech University, academic institutions are looking to improve lab safety. Officials are focusing on the issues of safety education, near-miss reporting and safety culture.

“If people understand the ‘why’ behind things, they’re more likely to do what they need to do.” Robert H. Hill, American Chemical Society

 

A report from the National Research Council states that major groups and leaders at universities need to be involved in lab safety and creating a safety culture.nrc

The American Chemical Society is working on safety education guidelines, looking into a centralized reporting system for incidents, and finalizing guidance on identifying hazards.

acsACS also wants academic institutions undergraduate chemistry departments to have a committee that promotes safety culture.

Academic labs are improving their safety, as young researchers are more aware, young faculty place higher priority on safety, and lab designs are becoming more secure. Continuous underlining of the importance of safety is vital to seeing positive change to the safety culture.

 

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Harmony Business Supplies offers quality disposable apparel for lab safety applications and much more.

Have a look at our Disposable Apparel products and stay safe.

 

Respirators – Protection from Airborne Particles

What is a Respirator?

A respirator is a device worn over the face/mouth designed to protect the wearer from inhaling harmful dusts, fumes, vapors, or gases. Respirators come in a wide range of types and sizes used by all sorts of industries.
Respirators cover the nose, mouth, and sometimes the eyes and face. They provide protection from airborne particles including dust, mist, liquids and fumes, gases or vapors. Respirators range from single-use disposable masks, to reusable models with replaceable cartridges.

Why Should You Use a Respirator?

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) estimates that deaths from work related respiratory diseases and cancers account for about 70% of all occupational disease deaths.

An estimated 5 million workers are required to wear respirators in 1.3 million workplaces throughout the United States. – US Department of Labor

Even “clean” industrial processes often generate large amounts of harmful particulate matter and require breathing protection. Respirators provide protection against work related respiratory diseases and cancers by filtering out harmful particulates.

How to Choose the Right Respirator

The contaminants, exposure, time, and concentration level of potential airborne particles is essential to know when choosing a respirator. If used in the workplace, a respiratory protection program must be in place according to the requirements set by OSHA Respiratory Protection Standards.

 

Styles of face masks to consider:

Half Face Mask:half face masks

  • Protects nose and mouth
  • Found in particulate and chemical cartridge/gas masks
  • Both in disposable and reusable respirator models
  • Eyewear and additional face protection may be needed

Full Face Mask:full face masks

  • Protects eyes, nose and mouth
  • Found in particulate and chemical cartridge/gas masks
  • Reusable respirators only

Respirator valve variations:

Valved:valved

  • One-way exhalation valve near the mouth
  • Allows user to experience cool, dry comfort
  • Found on these respirator types
  • Disposable and reusable particulate respirators
  • Chemical cartridge/gas mask respirators

Non-valved:non-valved

  • No vents to allow air movement
  • Hot air may build up inside respirator with long period of continuous use
  • Found only on disposable, particulate respirators

Respirator cartridges and filters:

Cartridges:cartridges

  • Used in respirators to protect against gases and vapors
  • Chemical cartridges block out vapors but not particles
  • Dual cartridges include a replaceable pre-filter to block airborne particles
  • Found on these respirator types
  • Disposable and reusable particulate respirators
  • Chemical cartridge/gas mask respirators

Filters:filters

  • Used in respirators to protect against airborne particles
  • Replacements are widely available
  • Not found in disposable respirators
  • Found in both particulate and chemical/gas mask respirators

 

Respirator Ratings

Respirators are rated by the type of contaminants and how much they filter out. Each rating has a letter (N) and number (95). The numbers refer to the percentage of one-micrometer particles removed during trials.

United States NIOSH standards define the following categories of particulate filters:

Oil resistance Rating Description
Not oil resistant N95 Filters at least 95% of airborne particles
N99 Filters at least 99% of airborne particles
N100 Filters at least 99.97% of airborne particles
Oil Resistant R95 Filters at least 95% of airborne particles
R99 Filters at least 99% of airborne particles
R100 Filters at least 99.97% of airborne particles
Oil Proof P95 Filters at least 95% of airborne particles
P99 Filters at least 99% of airborne particles
P100 Filters at least 99.97% of airborne particles

 

Protect yourself and your employees from harmful airborne particles with the right respirator.

Stay healthy and safety compliant by using respirators!

 

shop-for-respirators

 

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