The 5 OSHA Workplace Hazards

Under the right circumstances, virtually anything could become hazardous in the workplace. With sensible employee behavior and workplace conditions, however, the workplace hazards that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) warn against fall into just five main categories. We’ll review them below, and provide suggestions for mitigating dangers for each.

#1: Safety Hazards

(slips, trips and falls, faulty
equipment, etc.)

Safety risks refer to the conditions or substances found in the work environment which can pose danger of injuries. From falling objects to wet floors, these seemingly innocuous everyday risks have the potential to cause serious bodily harm. To minimize these hazards, there are a few things you can do:

  1. Never leave machinery unattended while in use
  2. Practice safety while working from heights
  3. Mandate the use of safety gear and safety apparel, like hardhats, and safety glasses
  4. Have your electrical wiring inspected regularly
  5. Provide the proper signage (like wet floor signs) to notify employees of spills, and clean them up promptly

Safety Hazards include:

  • Spills on floors or tripping hazards,
    such as blocked aisles or cords
    running across the floor
  • Working from heights, including
    ladders, scaffolds, roofs, or any
    raised work area
  • Unguarded machinery and moving
    machinery parts; guards removed or
    moving parts that a worker can
    accidentally touch
  • Electrical hazards like frayed cords,
    missing ground pins, improper
  • Confined spaces
  • Machinery-related hazards
    (lockout/tagout, boiler safety,
    forklifts, etc.)

#2: Biological Hazards

(mold, insects/pests,
communicable diseases, etc.)

These types of hazards tend to be exclusive to specific work environments. Particularly, anyone who works with infectious plants, people, or animals may be regularly exposed to biological hazards. Examples of occupations could include laboratory workers, daycare assistants, and personnel in hospitals, doctor’s offices, or nursing homes.

Coming into contact with substances like blood and other bodily fluids, animal droppings, bacteria and viruses, or fungi can put an individual at risk of becoming ill. To minimize these risks, it’s essential that you establish a protocol for handling biohazards and potentially infectious material. Additionally, make sure necessary supplies like disposable gloves are easily accessible. Sorbents can be used to clean up bio-hazards.  These powerful granules absorb the liquid, making them easy to clean-up.

Types of things you may be exposed to

  • Blood and other body fluids
  • Fungi/mold
  • Bacteria and viruses
  • Plants
  • Insect bites
  • Animal and bird droppings

#3: Physical Hazards

(noise, temperature extremes,
radiation, etc.)

Physical hazards are environmental factors which can cause injury without direct contact. For instance, radiation, temperature extremes, consistent loudness, and prolonged exposure to sunlight or ultraviolet rays all fall into this category. These are commonly considered the most difficult to detect, because signs don’t always present themselves right away.Like the other hazards listed here, reducing your employees’ risk of being exposed to physical hazards comes down to providing protection.

Hearing protection, for instance, should be considered mandatory for any individuals working around loud machinery. In settings where MEFs and microwaves are routinely emitted, employers must develop practices their teams can follow to limit exposure.

Physical Hazards include:

  • Radiation: including ionizing, nonionizing
    (EMF’s, microwaves,
    radiowaves, etc.)
  • High exposure to sunlight/ultraviolet
  • Temperature extremes – hot and cold
  • Constant loud noise

#4: Ergonomic Hazards

(repetition, lifting, awkward
postures, etc.)

Like physical hazards, ergonomic hazards may develop over time. Back strain and similar musculoskeletal disorders are often attributed to repetitive workplace motions. Even individuals who work desk jobs aren’t immune to suffering from back pain.

To combat ergonomic hazards, employers can offer training from specialists to help employees understand the importance of proper lifting techniques and posture. More and more employers are also exploring standing desk options to prevent associates from experiencing health complications associated with prolonged sitting.

Ergonomic Hazards include:

  • Improperly adjusted workstations and
  • Frequent lifting
  • Poor posture
  • Awkward movements, especially if
    they are repetitive
  • Repeating the same movements over
    and over
  • Having to use too much force,
    especially if you have to do it
  • Vibration

#5: Chemical/Dust Hazards

(cleaning products, pesticides,
asbestos, etc.)

Some chemicals are naturally more potent than others. While certain types are only dangerous when ingested or a person comes into direct contact with them, others are dangerous when simply inhaled. If your workforce uses chemicals regularly, you can keep employees safe by:

  1. Clearly labeling all chemicals
  2. Developing a protocol for handling chemicals
  3. Providing employees with the proper safety gear (respirators and gloves, for instance) to wear while in the presence of chemicals

Beware of:

  • Liquids like cleaning products, paints,
    acids, solvents – ESPECIALLY if
    chemicals are in an unlabeled
  • Vapors and fumes that come from
    welding or exposure to solvents
  • Gases like acetylene, propane, carbon
    monoxide and helium
  • Flammable materials like gasoline,
    solvents, and explosive chemicals.
  • Pesticides


No matter which types of hazards your workplace has, Harmony Business Supplies has all of the safety gear and products your team needs to stay healthy and injury-free. Browse through their supplies online now, or contact a product specialist to learn more.

Get a Hand with Chemical-Resistant Gloves

Get a Hand with Chemical-Resistant Gloves
Chemical Resistant 18 mil Yellow Latex Gloves
Chemical Resistant 18 mil Yellow Latex Gloves

You don’t need to get an A in Chemistry Class to understand that there are tons of kinds of chemicals in the world. Over 60 million kinds of chemicals are registered with Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) system. From these, about 80,000 are subject to utilization by various industries.

The Chemistry of Chemicals

Chemicals simply co-exist with many industrial operations today. Whether in manufacturing, automotive and electronic production, pharmaceutical, medical, and chemical laboratories, and even in agricultural industries, these chemicals are essential for daily process and are proven to be beneficial for the business.
It is said that ‘with great power comes great responsibility’, the saying is also true with chemicals. Handling these powerful elements certainly require a great amount of accountability. Why? Because there are certain chemicals that are corrosive or can cause visible destruction or permanent changes in human skin tissue at the site of contact. These substances can cause harm if not handled correctly.

Why Use Chemical Resistant Gloves?

Chemical Resistant 13" Green Nitrile Gloves
Chemical Resistant 13″ Green Nitrile Gloves

Ideal uses for chemical resistant gloves include food processing, automotive, metal fabrication, scientific research, and other areas of industry.Because you are handling powerful elements, wearing chemical-resistant gloves is one great way to demonstrate responsible chemical management and protect yourself, and your employees. Think of chemical-resistant gloves as Batman’s costume whenever you’re wearing it. Wearing protective gear helps to protect workers from injuries and helps save money and bad reports from accidents. Now that’s super!

Characteristics of Good Chemical Resistant Gloves

Chemical Resistant Neoprene Coated Latex Gloves
Chemical Resistant Neoprene Coated Latex Gloves

It is important that you opt for chemical-resistant gloves that have these essential attributes:


This is probably one of the first things that workers would consider as to whether or not they would wear chemical-resistant gloves. The level of comfort in wearing gloves can really affect how long one can bear to wear it. If the gloves offer poor level of comfort, workers are likely to remove them even if it means working with no protection at all. So make sure you invest in gloves that offer high levels of comfort. Besides, a ‘comfortable’ worker is more productive than one that is not.


Questions that you need to ask when opting for chemical-resistant gloves are ‘Is it making handling too slippery? Is it slowing down the hands’ mobility? Does wearing it make it more or less difficult to do the job?’ Even if the gloves offer comfort but still fail to give high level of performance, it would still not be as helpful as it ought to be.


Chemical Resistant 12" Smooth Finish PVC Coated Glove
Chemical Resistant 12″ Smooth Finish PVC Coated Glove

Finally, consider the gloves’ level of protection when handling corrosive chemicals. The very reason why chemical handlers are required to wear chemical-resistant gloves is to protect them upon contact with the substances. This is why it is essential that you choose the kind of gloves with a high level of protection against chemical contact such as acids. Keeping your hands protected from chemical injuries and irritation means wearing the right glove for the job. We offer chemical resistant gloves that can be used for any work application, from cleanup to directly handling harsh and hazardous liquids. Keep workers’ hands safe while providing dexterity and comfort needed to improve productivity.