Categories
Coated Gloves Cut Resistant Gloves Gloves Hand Protection Safety Work Gloves

Hand Injuries & Prevention

How to Prevent Hand Injuries

cut hazard, cut resistant gloves

The U.S. Bureau of Labor and Statistics (BLS) reports that hand injuries are the second most work-related injury, resulting in over a million emergency room visits in a year. Hand injuries can range from simple to very serious, taking its toll not only on a workers’ well-being but also on the company’s reputation.

Some examples of the most common types of hand injuries:

Cut Resistant Gloves
Lacerations (63%)

Skin cuts or lacerations have the highest occurrence of traumatic hand injuries in the workplace due to the use of cutting tools such as knives, razors and power tools. The damage due from a laceration can range from a simple skin cut to more serious injuries such as severed nerves, tendons and even limbs.

Crush Injuries (13%)

High pressured machines and other tools used to pound, squeeze, or pulverize objects in the workplace can cause accidental crush injuries to the hands. This type of hand injury results in seriously fractured bones, which could also affect nerves, leading to temporary or permanent paralysis.

Punctures (6%)

Hand puncture injury can be caused by using sharp and pointed tools such as knives, wires and nails. It can cause serious damage to a nerve or bone and even cause infection if left untreated.

Prevent Hand Injuries: What to do?

Cut Resistant Gloves

Workers who are exposed to the use of machinery and mechanisms on a daily basis are susceptible to hand injuries. This is why it is essential to minimize the occurrence or damage caused by on-the-job hazards.

Wear the Right Hand Protection

Cut Resistant Gloves
Wearing protective gear can lessen the risk of getting your hands injured. All you have to do is to select the proper type of gloves according to specific needs.

 
If you are working in a construction industry, opt for gloves that are made with leathers (leather work gloves) or polymers which can protect your hands from abrasive materials such as wood or metal splinters.

 
If you are handling chemicals, it is best to opt for chemical resistant gloves to avoid direct contact. These special gloves are usually made of latex, nitrile, neoprene, polyvinyl-chloride, or other polymer materials that can resist corrosive chemical substances.

 
If you use knives or are concerned about lacerations using a cut-resistant glove may prevent cuts. There are different materials these gloves are made of, but the most common would use Kevlar. There are also different ratings of cut-resistant gloves. The higher the rating the more protection you are afforded.

Commit to a Safety Program

Since workplace injuries and accidents among employees can be very costly, it is crucial for employers to ensure the health and safety of their workforce.

 
Thus, safety programs must be initiated by companies since most employees have very minimal awareness about why such training is vital, e.g. proper wear and care of hand protections.

 
Not only will it educate employees about working safely but it will also help prevent injuries in the workplace.

Categories
Hearing Protection Safety Tips

Why Employees Don’t Wear Hearing Protection

Reasons Employees Don’t Wear Hearing Protection

Believe it or not, our hearing ability is a huge investment when it comes to work. That’s why it’s essential to take good care of our ear health while in the work field as much as possible.

 
There are several work environments that expose employees to noise levels that are actually unsafe and could promote hearing-loss such as places like construction sites or steel mills. It is vital for workers to keep a sound hearing ability as it is a crucial factor within the work environment, e.g. with regards to communication.

 
Without the use of proper hearing protection devices (HPD), workers may not be able to protect themselves from occupational noise exposure and thus it might be the case for them to acquire hearing impairment, or worse, hearing loss. This could also be the grounds for reduced productivity of workers in the field.

 
Unfortunately, most workers don’t wear HPD because of a number of reasons which affect their consideration to do so. Here they are:

Reason 1: Comfort Level

EAR MUFFS W/ ADJUSTABLE HEADBAND

Wearing HPD for some workers depend on how they actually ‘feel’ while wearing them. The comfort level of any wearable device greatly matters. Wearing HPD that are built and designed with very little consideration to a wearer’s ease may in fact be the grounds of some workers to NOT wear them at all.

 
The solution for this Hearing Protection Device dilemma is to actually give a good amount of time to actually canvass and research about which types of HPD prefer, both ease and functionality. After all, a comfortable worker is a productive one.

Reason 2: Supply vs. Demand

3M Foam Corded Ear Plugs

Sometimes, certain work environments lack in supply of hearing protection devices, so that not all of the workers get to wear one. Because of such a HPD deficit, some employees tend to work with no aid of HPD in an excessively noisy environment, e.g. construction sites and airport fields, to name a few.

 

In other cases, workers tend to go from one area to another. That’s why areas which are prone to high levels of noise should have hearing protection available for roaming workers at all times.

Reason 3: Hearing Conservation Training

E-A-R Swerve Banded Hearing Protector

Companies that operate in environments with extreme noise levels should consider organizing Hearing Conservation Training for their workforce. Not only is it crucial for firms to consider the wellness of their workers but it can also help their employees work productively.

 
Also, promoting initial training can help workers gain knowledge on the importance of HPD usage to their own benefit as well as promote the habit of wearing HPD at work.

Reason 4: Noise Levels in an Environment

Thunder T3 Noise Ear Muffs

Of course, the demand on the use of hearing protection in the work field depends on the nature of work. More specifically, hearing protection device usage considers the levels of noise that are being produced in the environment plus the length of time that workers are exposed to such noise.

 
Simply put, if you work in an ordinary office environment then you would not need earplugs or earmuffs, since such environment has very little probability of exposure to extreme noise. The only earplugs you’ll be needing in an office are earphones so you can stay upbeat and groovy while at work.

 
On the contrary, work environments that are exposed to tremendous noise levels should always consider HPD for workers, e.g. power drills that register 98 decibels (dB) which could cause hearing damage in a matter of 30 minutes.

 
To sum it up, in working environments with noise level ranging from 85 dB (the “Action” level) and up, workers must consider wearing HPD to protect them from damaging their hearing ability.

 

Browse our selection Hearing Protection Devices.

Not sure what you need?

Give us a call and our Supply Specialists will be glad to assist you.

(800) 899-1255

Categories
Disposable Apparel Eye Protection Safety Tips

Eye Protection for Infection & Hazards

Protecting Your Eyes

eye protection

Isn’t it great to be at your best in everything you do? Whether its work or leisure, it pays to have good eyesight. There’s nothing like hours of diligent hard work at the machine shop with a project that’s waiting for promising pay. Having good vision lessens the risk of injuries and unwanted accidents.

No doubt that you and I want to have the same great moments at work or play, but unfortunately there are some things that can get in our way, particularly with our vision.

Eye injuries in the work place are very common. Thousands of U.S. workers sustain job-related eye injuries every day! Choosing the right eye protection minimizes potential exposure to hazards and infectious diseases via ocular exposure.

Imagine not being able to meet a project’s deadline because a smokey and dusty environment is making it seeing difficult seeing your work on a machine. Or, handling corrosive chemicals in the lab and you have no eye protection on? Can you even imagine medical professionals not using eye protection? Definitively not!

Reasons for Eye Injury

Dust, small particles, smoke, harmful chemicals and ocular diseases can all impact our vision. Chemicals and flying shards are just some of the hazards facing many modern workplaces. Healthcare workers, lab workers and janitorial staff are all prone to infectious diseases from eye exposure.

The 2 major reasons eye injuries/infection happen on the job are:

  1. No eye protection was being worn
  2. The wrong kind of eye protection was worn for the job

Some occupations that have a high risk of eye injuries/infection include:

  • Construction
  • Carpentry
  • Electrical work
  • Maintenance
  • Lab work
  • Health/Dental care
  • Welding

Good eye protection provides a barrier to infectious or dangerous materials getting in your eyes.

Proper eye protection can actually help enhance your performance, improve your eyesight given the right kind of lens, and prevent exposure to harmful particles and harsh chemicals that might permanently harm your eyesight.

All you need to do is to pick the right the right kind of eye protection for your activity.

Picking Proper Protection

Safety Goggles

safety goggles

If you’re in an environment where chemicals are being used, there is a risk of it splashes getting into your eyes. Choose the safety goggles with an appropriate and comfy fit. Also, chooses ones that that reduce fogging also known as anti-fog safety goggles.

Full-Face Shield Eye Protection

full face shield

If you’re in a machine shop, you need a full-face shields, particularly when you are welding. This will keep your entire face from getting exposed to welding heat, sparks and smoke. You can use face shields as well on pretty much any kind of work akin to that of welding or any that keeps your entire face exposed to harmful materials.

In a medical or dental environment, using a full-face shield offers the most protection. Full-face shields cover more of the face and offer more protection from liquids in medical and dental applications.

Safety Glasses

safety glasses

For anything else less risky at the workplace , you can simply opt for safety glasses to protect your eyes from dust and flying fragments and even give your eyes protection from direct UV exposure. Safety glasses are ideal for impact protection but less so for splash or chemical protection.

Use the right eye protection in unison with other Personal Protection Equipment (PPE) such as disposable gloves, isolation gowns, face masks and other items. Remember to opt for the right kind of eye protection either at work or play. You only get one set of eyes and you want to do your best to protect them.

Still not sure what you need?

Call our Harmony Supply Specialists (800 899-1255) to get just the right protection for your needs.

Categories
Disposable Apparel Disposable Coveralls Disposable Gloves Disposable Shoe Covers Harmony Safety Work Gloves

Back From The 2016 National Safety Council Expo

2016 National Safety Council Expo

Jeff dropped by the World’s Largest Annual Safety Exhibit in Anaheim, CA earlier this week to find the best new safety products for our customers. He scouted more than 1,000 exhibitors showcasing new and innovative safety products across 200,000 sq ft.!

In the coming weeks we will be introducing new safety products straight from leading industry manufacturers to you!

Here’s a sneak-peek at what’s coming.

High Visibility Garments

Being seen is critical for worker safety, especially in equipment and vehicle work, and low light environments. We’re expanding our Highly Visible Safety Garments including jackets, hoodies, pants, rain gear & more.

Keystone Disposable Coveralls

New Keystone Microporous Coveralls are 40% thicker and 40% less than Tyvek Coveralls! Saving you money and providing extra performance.

Disposable Black Shoe Covers

Hard to find black protective shoe covers will be available from Harmony! These shoe covers look professional for industry work and contractors and are a breathable, cloth-like material. Protects carpets and floors, and fits over work boots!

Disposable High Visibility Gloves

Great for food processing plants.  The diamond grip surface for sure handling in wet conditions.  Bright orange gloves can be easily seen for compliance and the extra-thick 8 mil glove won’t shred.

All in all, a productive show for Harmony.

Categories
Gloves Safety Tips

New ANSI Standards – 2016 Changes to Hand Safety

 

Who is ANSI?

The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) has served as administrator and coordinator of the United States private sector voluntary standardization system for over 90 years. Founded in 1918 by five engineering societies and three government agencies, the Institute remains a private, nonprofit membership organization supported by a diverse private and public sector organizations.

This organization is responsible for the standard testings for cut resistant gloves.

 

New Scale & Testing to Determine Cut Scores

The new ANSI standard now features 9 (previously 5) cut levels which significantly reduce the gaps between each level and better define protection levels for the cut resistant gloves and sleeves with the highest gram scores.

New ANSI cut scores will feature an “A” in front of the score.

The new ANSI Standards also outline a new test method for determining the new cut scores. The new test method allows for only one type of machine to be used. Under the previous ANSI standard, the testing could be performed on a couple of different machines. By ensuring uniform testing with one machine, it is easier to compare gram scores for a given material.

img-ansi-test-machines

 

Why A New Standard?

The need was recognized for a more consistent and accurate testing method between ANSI/ISEA and European safety standards. While these changes do not create uniformity between the two standards, they do bridge the gap.

There are three main reasons the standards are changing:

  1. The US and Europeon standards are very different in classification and testing methods, yet both provide a 1-5 ranking scale which causes confusion.
  2. The standards were created prior to advances in PPE technology, and they don’t address current high cut resistant materials.
  3. The 1-5 scale for both EN388 and ANSI/ISEA 105 includes large gaps between some of the levels creating the potential for the use of insufficient PPE.

 

How Is It Tested? – Understanding Test Methods

The sample is cut by a straight-edge blade, under load, that moves along a straight path. The sample is cut five times each at three different loads with a new blade for each cut and the data is used to determine the required load to cut through the sample at a specified reference difference.

This is referred to as the cutting force, which is then equated to a cut level.

img-ansi-test-method

 

What New Cut Levels Mean For You

Cut Protection Glove performance has improved significantly in recent years. As a result, there are more “cut protection” gloves to choose from.

The chart below will show you whether the cut level you have been using has changed or stayed the same. Reference your current rated glove and load with the new levels to find where you fit in to ensure proper protection.

With these new levels, you may need to move up in level to ensure adequate protection.

Be sure to reference the revised cut specs when ordering gloves in the future.

new-ansi-levels

cropped-header_logo-3.png

Categories
Coated Gloves Gloves Safety Work Gloves

Get A Grip On Palm Coated Gloves

What Are Coated Gloves?

Nothing beats a firm grip on work. Palm Coated Gloves (AKA Dipped Gloves) are designed to protect your hands from cuts and abrasions and offer extra grip.

Most coated gloves are made of engineered knit fibers for the glove part. The glove “shell” is then dipped in various coatings to make that great gripping texture and protection!

Different Coatings, Different Jobs

Coatings provide additional protection while resisting punctures and abrasions and offering improved grip while working.

Natural Rubber Latex Palm Coated Gloves latex-coated-gloves

Natural Rubber Textured Latex Palm Coatings offer good grip. Latex coating provides abrasion resistance and is great for handling building materials. Latex has very high elasticity and grip compared to other glove materials, and withstands extreme temperature and tearing.

Latex coated gloves are great for a number of tasks including general maintenance, shipping, receiving, assembling, and concrete/brick/lumber handling.

  • High elasticity and grip.
  • Great tear resistance.
  • Poor resistance against most hydrocarbon and organic solvents (i.e. gasoline).
  • Can cause allergic reactions.

Nitrile Palm Coated Glovesnitrile-coated-gloves

Nitrile Palm Coating has high puncture and chemical resistance. It offers greater tactile feedback, grip, and abrasion resistance, even when wet. 3x more puncture resistant than rubber latex!

Nitrile coated gloves provide excellent resistance to punctures, cuts, snags, abrasions, oils, and fuels.

  • Synthetic version of latex.
  • 3x more puncture resistant than latex rubber.
  • Stands up well to oil, organic solvents, and fuels.

Nitrile Micro Foam Coated Glovesmicro-foam-nitrile-coated-gloves

Nitrile micro foam coated gloves are a good choice for working in “wet” environments. The microfoam coating acts similar to a sponge and provides extra gripping power.

  • Additional foam coating acts like a sponge, increasing gripping power.
  • Good tactile sensitivity and dexterity.

Polyurethane Palm Coated Glovespolyurethane-coated-gloves

Great for small parts handling. Non-allergenic. Good stretch, strength, and softness. Low particulate shed. Great for protection from cuts from sheet metal, steel & glass. Resistant to oils, solvents and grease. They are not designed to protect from excessive heat or cold or from harsh chemicals.

  • Grips well without being “sticky”.
  • Breathable and dexterous.
  • Resists oil, solvents, gasoline, fats, greases, and oxidation.
  • Poor resistance to hot water.

Shop Coated Gloves

cropped-header_logo-4.png